The AUKUS deal says more about US plans to take on China than Biden will admit

Updated: October 14th, 2021 07:40 PM IST

Former Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull, who signed the deal to buy French submarines in 2016, speaks to ⁦@JackDetsch⁩ ⁦of ⁦@ForeignPolicy⁩ on AUKUS, China, Trans-Pacific Partnership and much more.

The AUKUS deal says more about US plans to take on China than Biden will admit

Kenyas president, freshly implicated in the Pandora Papers leak, will be the first African leader Biden has met at the White House since he assumed the presidency.

Q&A: Turnbull: AUKUS Subs Deal Is an ‘Own Goal’ Turnbull: AUKUS Subs Deal Is an ‘Own Goal’... | View Comments ()

It only took hours for the Biden administration’s deal to build nuclear-powered submarines with Britain and Australia to create a diplomatic firestorm. France, whose contract to build diesel-electric submarines for Canberra was subsequently canceled, recalled its ambassadors from both Washington and Canberra. And now, the controversy is kicking up back in Australia.

Some of the harshest words for the trilateral submarine partnership, popularly known as AUKUS, are coming from a surprising source: former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who recently spoke out publicly against the move. He fears that his successor, Scott Morrison, has flat-out deceived the French, an emerging power in the Pacific, something that could have long-lasting consequences for Australian relations with Europe. (Turnbulls criticism might not be too surprising: his government signed the deal to buy French submarines in 2016).

It only took hours for the Biden administration’s deal to build nuclear-powered submarines with Britain and Australia to create a diplomatic firestorm. France, whose contract to build diesel-electric submarines for Canberra was subsequently canceled, recalled its ambassadors from both Washington and Canberra. And now, the controversy is kicking up back in Australia.

Some of the harshest words for the trilateral submarine partnership, popularly known as AUKUS, are coming from a surprising source: former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who recently spoke out publicly against the move. He fears that his successor, Scott Morrison, has flat-out deceived the French, an emerging power in the Pacific, something that could have long-lasting consequences for Australian relations with Europe. (Turnbull’s criticism might not be too surprising: his government signed the deal to buy French submarines in 2016).

Foreign Policy took the opportunity to talk to Turnbull about the controversial deal and its diplomatic fallout, Australia and its increasingly contentious relations with China, and Canberra’s growing role in the Pacific.

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